This 'n' That

Merry Sparkly Christmas!

When Lisa showed us this gorgeous, drapey rose gold sequin fabric on the December Sew Over It Vlog I couldn’t resist, even though I’ve never been a sequin and sparkles kinda gal.

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I don’t normally go out-out much (ahh!) so don’t really have the need for going-outy-type-sparkly-tops, but with Christmas just around the corner I knew straight away that I wanted to wear a sequin cami top for The Big Day.

I’ve made the Sew Over It Silk Cami before and have never really adjusted the pattern, other grading it in at the waist, as I’d never be able to get it on and off if I made it too fitted (at least not without adding a zip) but with the sequin fabric having a slight stretch to it, I wanted to make it a bit more fitted. With Lauren from Guthrie & Ghani assuring me in one of her super-helpful vlogs that you can sew darts in sequin fabrics I decided to add an FBA to the pattern. I used this tutorial from Sewaholic, which I like because it tapers the waist back down to the original size.

Also, I’ve found with past camis (and other makes) that I get a lot of fabric pooling at the back of my waist, so I looked up how to do a simple Sway Back Adjustment and came across this Maria Denmark one. To achieve this adjustment I had to add a seam allowance to the centre back of the pattern, so that I’d cut the fabric as two pieces rather than cutting it on the fold.

The other adjustments I made were to grade the waist as usual, and also raise the armholes slightly so they don’t show my bra at the sides. Here’s what my adjusted pattern looks like (looks a bit odd with that sway back!):

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I made a quick toile before I cut into my sequin fabric, just to make sure, and all was fine so I cracked on… and the instant I cut into the fabric there were SEQUINS EVERYWHERE! They went all over the sewing room, all around the house, in my hair and my socks, and I even found one the next morning stuck to my left boob!

Anyway…!

I used a leather needle, size 90, for sewing the sequin fabric, along with a walking foot, and I’m pleased to say there were no breakages or mishaps in that department.

I needed to line this cami because of the scratchiness of the sequins, so, with the fabric having a bit of stretch, I cut the lining on the bias to allow some give there too. Once I’d got the main and lining fabrics sewed up with their darts, side seams, and back seam, I then attached the two together at the neck:

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Then I used the Burrito method – this is a good tutorial from Melly Sews – to join the armholes of the fabric and lining together, which all went well until I had to pull the fabric back through the narrow straps and the sequins all caught against each other. Argh! It was all okay in the end, thankfully, and I didn’t lose too many sequins in the process or end up with any bald patches, but I had to be carefully *persuasive* in getting it through.

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All that was left was under-stitching to keep the lining in place on the inside and then the hemming. I used bias binding on the hem of the sequin fabric so it’s not scratchy inside and hand stitched it so doesn’t show on the outside (SewNeedy will be proud of me!).

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And that’s it, all done! The fit has ended up a bit looser than I was planning, but it’s “interesting” getting it on and off as the sequins could potentially scratch your face to pieces (slight exaggeration there, but still!) so actually it’s better being looser and, of course, the style of the SOI Silk Cami is drapey anyway. The sway back adjustment has made a huge difference, so I’ll definitely be doing that again.

Here I am wearing it with some simple black skinny jeans to really highlight the gorgeous sequins…

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Merry Christmas to all of our SewNeedy and Daphne followers. Here’s to a new year filled with fabrics, threads, patterns, and maybe some more sequins too!

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